COVID-19 Testing in Rhode Island

Who should get a COVID-19 test?

You should get tested for COVID-19 if:

If you don't have symptoms and haven’t recently been exposed to someone who has COVID-19, you don’t need to get tested for COVID-19.

How can I get a COVID-19 test?

There are several ways to get tested for COVID-19 in Rhode Island. Explore the options listed below. 

Call your primary care provider or child’s pediatrician. Ask if they offer COVID-19 testing in their office or can order a test through a laboratory.

If you don’t have a primary care provider or pediatrician, you can get tested at a pharmacy or clinic, or use a self-test kit. Federal programs are available to support access to COVID-19 testing for people without health insurance.

Call or click the links below to make an appointment.

Some clinics may only test you if have symptoms of COVID-19 or are a close contact of someone who tested positive. 

If you don’t have insurance, the pharmacy or clinic will submit the cost of your test to a federal program for the uninsured.

About COVID-19 self-tests

Kits that you can use to test yourself for COVID-19 are available through local distributions, pharmacies, and online retailers. Sometimes a COVID-19 self-test is also called an at-home test or an over-the counter (OTC) test. 

Tests performed by trained staff at a clinic or pharmacy, or by a healthcare provider may provide more accurate results. But using a self-test is an option if you cannot get to a testing site, or if you are asymptomatic but would like to test yourself right before attending a large gathering. 

For more information and guidance about testing yourself for COVID-19, visit this web page from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Self-test results

To submit your self-test result to RIDOH, visit portal.ri.gov/s/selftest or download the 401Health app.

RIDOH cannot provide the following based on a self-test result:

  • Referrals to services or supports for individuals who need assistance during isolation or quarantine.
  • A letter for missed work or school due to isolation based on a positive self-test result. If a letter is required, contact a healthcare provider.
  • Documentation of infection within the past 90 days based on a positive self-test result.

For information on what to do after getting a negative or positive result on a COVID-19 self-test, visit RIDOH's frequently asked questions (FAQs) about COVID-19 testing.

 

Federal programs are available to support access to COVID-19 testing for people without health insurance. If you’re uninsured and don’t know whether a site offers free testing, please call the site to confirm before making an appointment.

  • Increasing Community Access to Testing (ICATT) for COVID-19: CDC’s ICATT program can help you find where to get a free COVID-19 laboratory test whether or not you have insurance. These tests can tell if you have a current COVID-19 infection. You’ll get a result usually within 24–72 hours after you get tested.
  • Test To Treat Program: Through this program, people are able to get tested and – if they are positive and treatments are appropriate for them – get a prescription from a healthcare provider, and have their prescription filled all at one location. A Test to Treat locator is available to help find participating sites. Some sites on the locator can only fill a prescription, and require that a healthcare provider evaluate and prescribe you COVID-19 medication just as they normally would. A call center is also available at 1-800-232-0233 (TTY 1-888-720-7489) to get help in multiple languages.
  • Local pharmacies and clinics: Some local pharmacies and clinics offer free COVID-19 testing to people who don’t have health insurance. Some clinics may only test you if have symptoms or are a close contact of someone who tested positive.  If you don’t have insurance, the pharmacy or clinic will submit the cost of your test to a federal program for the uninsured.